Balance and Composure

Syracuse Shows Presents

Balance and Composure

Roger Harvey, Worriers

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

7:00 pm

The Lost Horizon

$15.00 - $18.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

Balance and Composure
Balance and Composure
According to Balance and Composure, they can be loud, quiet and everything in between. A pretty apt description in a nutshell. Once you get down to an intricate school of thought, the lyricism of singer/guitarists Jonathan Simmons and Andrew Slaymaker show things in a different light. Having all met in the Philadelphia suburb of Doylestown, PA through mutual projects during their high school years, Balance and Composure decided to start what they called a "real band" once former projects dissolved. Once completing the formation of the band, Balance and Composure hit the ground running and have yet to look back.

A sonic assault melding influences such as Sunny Day Real Estate, Neutral Milk Hotel and Nirvana, their upcoming full length "Separation" adheres to the band's namesake. A cohesive listen of anthemic and melodic guitar blitzes with poignant lyricism, rhythmic thrusts and an abrasive pop knack in its overall deliverance, "Separation" churns in a fortified enclave of gutiar fuzz and impending rhythms that drive heavily. Balance and Composure may wear their love for early 90's underground alt rock on their sleeves, but they are in no way merely a "throwback" band as much as they are an outfit who respects their influences, and pushes them forward into brash sonic terrortory with the us vs. the world ethos of geniune punk rock.

After self releasing their first EP "I Just Want To Be Pure" in 2008, followed by their "Only Boundaries" EP and split EP with Tigers Jaw both on No Sleep Records, Balance and Composure are surprised the world with their debut full length "Separation", out now on No Sleep Records, which could also be found on virtually every "Best Of 2011" album list made.
Roger Harvey
Roger Harvey
Coming of age in Pennsylvania's snowbelt and traveling with bands since before he was a teenager, Harvey began cutting his songwriting teeth in his early 20s as Dandelion Snow while laying down new roots in Kings County, Brooklyn. Relocating back to his home state in 2010 to form the punk act White Wives, he quickly began collecting new material.

As heartbreaking as it is uplifting, Twelve Houses is a fiercely deliberate case study on nostalgia, perspective, and transformation. A beautifully lush record connected by recurring themes and symbolism, the album veers effortlessly from guitar rock to psychedelia, at times intimately minimal and others instrumentally oversaturated, Twelve Houses sounds like the record Jeff Mangum would have made if he'd grown up in the 90s.
Worriers
Worriers
Lauren Denitzio is a maven at writing pop-punk anthems. Playing music for over a decade —beginning with the New Brunswick punk band The Measure [sa]—we had yet to see what Denitzio could accomplish as a sole songwriter until recently. Worriers, the Brooklyn-based band fronted by Denitzio and joined by friends, has released the 7" "Past Lives" on No Idea Records in 2011, the 12" EP "Cruel Optimist" on Don Giovanni Records in 2013, as well as the 7" "Sinead O'Rebellion" on Yo-Yo Records in 2013. This summer, Worriers brings us their finest work to date, with Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! as producer, on their first full-length release Imaginary Life.

Being released by Don Giovanni Records, Imaginary Life is Denitzio's first time single-handedly generating an entire record's worth of material. Accompanied by Rachel Rubino (Each Other's Mothers, Troubled Sleep) and John McLean (Dead Dog, Todd Killingz) on lead guitars, Audrey Zee Whitesides (Mal Blum, Little Waist) on bass, Mike Yannich (The Ergs) on drums, and Lou Hanman (Caves) on backing vocals, Denitzio also asked Laura Jane Grace to produce the record. Working with a woman producer, and someone who came from a DIY background, was crucial to Denitzio. Grace enthusiastically agreed and brought on Marc Hudson, Against Me!'s front-of-house sound person and tour manager, to engineer the record at his studio in Fenton, MI. Grace also took Worriers on a nine-day tour with Against Me! in February to become better acquainted with their sound. In the studio, the group worked meticulously on the tracks—even creating multiple versions of certain songs using Casio beats—to give them time to develop into exactly what they were looking to create.

"I was writing songs that had to do with moments in my life that only happened very briefly, or things that could have happened had things gone a little differently, both in positive and negative ways," says Denitzio. "I don't mean regrets, but how life could be entirely different if you make a couple of different choices."

While Imaginary Life doesn't stray too far from past Worriers' releases, it resonates stronger than ever in both sound and message. It flows fittingly backwards, opening with "Jinx," a softer song that barely hits the one-minute-mark. We are presented with what seems to be a reflection of the current state of life and a fear of change, how goods things have been and wanting to hold onto that. From here, the album cracks wide open into all that ever came before. "Glutton for Distance," with it's mathy guitar leads and overflowing lyrics, depicts the desire to sustain a long-distance relationship. In "Chasing," there is a bit of a departure from what we've come to know of Worriers; it's pop beat is reminiscence of something we'd hear on the radio rather than at a punk show. It's unexpected but natural, juxtaposed to dark lyrics about giving into unrequited love and carried along by Denitzio's polished vocals. In the resolute political ballad "They / Them / Theirs" we are questioned regarding notions of the gender binary and the frustrations that come with it. "Plans" and "Most Space," two of the catchiest songs on Imaginary Life, are reminders of what tripped us up over Denitzio's songwriting in the first place—fast and infectious guitars, anthemic lyrics, and unyielding vocals that Worriers never fails to provide.
Venue Information:
The Lost Horizon
5863 Thompson Rd.
Syracuse, NY, 13214
http://www.thelosthorizon.com